Tag: drawing classes

Consider the Aspects of Painting

Do you like to paint using oil paint? In this article, oil paints expert review will give some considerations that you need to do when you are going to paint using oil paint.

Make a rough sketch. Use a pencil to create thin lines. You can also do it directly on canvas or on paper first, then transfer using carbon paper. When you draw your subject, think of the composition and use of negative space.

The composition is the arrangement of images on a canvas. Choose the best placement so that the eyes are fixed on the canvas as a whole, rather than lingering in the same place. Add overlapping layers, because this will deepen your composition. If your subject does not have overlapping shapes, consider rearranging it. This will make your painting seem more real.

Determine the light source. To create a painting that looks real, you must have clear light and dark parts. Observe your subject and find out from what angle the light comes. And where the shadow falls and the part that is exposed to the light is located. All light will create shadows, but if it falls past the subject it will be very difficult to see. Try moving your light source so that the shadows and the illuminated area are more clearly visible.

Consider your color. For some painters, it is very difficult to match the colors of their subjects with the colors they mix. This is because the brain provides its own understanding of color; if you see the sky is blue, then you mix blue paint, only to realize that the paint is brighter and more colorful than the real sky. The trick is to go through the understanding of colors in our brain and observe the true colors. This will brighten your painting. Painting at night will look darker than painting at noon, which is brighter.

Observe the movement of your subject. Can your painting still look alive if there is no movement? Or do pastures on a windy day create a lot of movement? Paying attention to the movements of the subject is very important to plan brush strokes. Real paintings use brushstrokes that create motion, or vice versa.